Ethnic Diversity, National Unity: Moral Pedagogies of togetherness for Ethiopia edited by Thedros A. Teklu

Sale price $35.00 Regular price $36.00

Review Quotes:

"This timely text critically probes ethnic diversity and national unity in Ethiopia, one of Africa's oldest nation-states, by critically analyzing political crises, explores the idea of unity in diversity, and invites readers to think about the self and the other in a common national space in light of a moral vision that promotes coexistence. This interdisciplinary text draws insights from history, law, ethics, scriptural studies, moral and political theology. I highly recommend this because it offers excellent perspectives on the quest for harmony." --Elias Kifon Bongmba, Rice University "Recent global political events have once again highlighted the importance of critical academic studies at the intersections of ethnicity and nationhood. This volume of essays is a very timely and important contribution to the field. It presents an important series of interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary, reflections on the moral pedagogies of belonging and identity among Ethiopians. Each of the texts left me with new insights, answers to important questions, and a deeper understanding." --Dion A. Forster, University of Stellenbosch "Ethiopia has always been able to construct a story that it could tell to the outside world. However, internally negotiating a story that does justice to its ethnic and religious plurality remained its Achilles' heel. Even when political architecture was not strong enough, it was the moral arc that held the nation together. That, however, is now being eroded by the social media-driven grievances and a sharp rise of ethno-nationalist politics. As a result, the discursive space has significantly shrank and Ethiopia's long-held national unity has been increasingly threatened. Therefore, sober and skilful reflections on the moral foundations of living in a shared space vis-a-vis ethnic plurality was long overdue. Theodros A. Teklu's Ethnic Diversity, National Unity is a stunning achievement not only in addressing this very timely issue in Ethiopia, but also in bringing together young and bright Ethiopian scholars into the conversation." --Mohammed Girma, author of Understanding Religion and Social Change in Ethiopia


Review Quotes:

"This is a thoughtful and fascinating book which addresses a question academically relevant as well as foremost in the minds of many Ethiopians today: how to reconcile the facts and feelings of ethnic diversity and its discursive representations with sources of moral thinking and action in shared spaces. . . . The various contributions break new ground and suggest that religious thinking can provide rich and unifying elements for sociopolitical discourse not only geared towards toleration but also towards acceptance of the 'Other' in an overarching framework of symbiosis and understanding that the country needs. . . . When ethnicity or, in some cases, religion are used for developing antagonism or 'enemy images, ' that is a choice; it is never a necessity or destiny. In this vein, the book offers very interesting reflections and case studies that will interest a broad readership, with crucial elements for developing a new ethical discourse of interaction, acceptance, and unity in diversity, and with the underlying view that humans are all one under the eye of the eternal and can work to realize that vision." --Jon Abbink, Leiden University "Ethnic Diversity, National Unity is a rare jewel of masterful insights on ethnopolitical cohesion for the Ethiopian context and elsewhere. The contributors creatively handle the various aspects of ethnicity, politics, and identity issues that have often been causes of hostility, prejudice, and rivalry among the various ethnic communities not only in Ethiopia but also throughout the world. The writers see the antidote of ethnopolitical violence in morality, religion, and justice. Thus, this book is relevant beyond Ethiopia. I, therefore, recommend it to those keen on understanding the aforesaid issues and finding a solution to them." --David Tarus, Association for Christian Theological Education in Africa